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Deepfakes, disinformation, and the former NATO bunker housing a bulletproof hosting service

In this week’s Cyber Security Brief, Dick O’Brien, Candid Wueest and Brigid O’Gorman discuss the high cost of ransomware, and the emergence of disinformation-as-a-service on underground markets. We also chat about researchers finding a way to steal data from encrypted PDFs, and the bulletproof hosting service housed in a former NATO bunker in Germany that was recently shut down by police. Finally, we discuss the issue of deepfake videos, the problems they could present, and the steps Google and others are taking to tackle them.

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Tortoiseshell APT group, vBulletin zero-day, and Facebook suspends thousands of apps

We’re back! The Cyber Security Brief returns for season 2. In our first episode, Dick O’Brien is joined by Brigid O’Gorman and Gavin O’Gorman (no relation) to discuss our recent research into Tortoiseshell, an APT group we recently discovered using both custom and off-the-shelf malware to target IT providers in Saudi Arabia in what appear to be supply chain attacks with the end goal of compromising the IT providers’ customers. We also discuss the recently revealed vulnerability in vBulletin, the release of iOS 13, a ransomware attack on a healthcare facility in Wyoming, and Facebook suspending thousands of apps from its platform.

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Cloud security, telecoms companies compromised, and can someone else access your Nest camera?

In this week’s Cyber Security Brief, it’s episode 52, and the last one before we take a short summer break – we will be back with you in August, with more essential stories and trends from the world of cyber security. This week, we discuss the Cloud Security Threat Report that was recently released by Symantec, reports that APT10 compromised the networks of at least 10 telecoms companies, and the unusual circumstances that led to the arrest of a member of the Anonymous Belgium hacking group. Also, how a bug allowed the past owners of Nest cameras to spy on current owners, even after a factory reset. Finally, as the value of Bitcoin surges again, we have two cryptocurrency-related stories as two brothers are arrested in relation to the massive Bitfinex hack that occurred in 2016, and a new coinminer is emulating Linux to target both Windows and Mac systems. Don’t forget, while we are off air, we will still be posting blogs and tweets, so make sure to follow us on Twitter (@ThreatIntel), and to read our blogs at http://www.pingan7.com.cn/blogs/threat-intelligence and on Medium at https://medium.com/threat-intel.

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Waterbug, “smart” TVs, and BEC scam hits Canadian city

In this week’s Cyber Security Brief podcast, we discuss the drama that ensued when Samsung tweeted about scanning their smart TVs for malware, a city in Canada lost CA$500,000 to a BEC scam, and three universities in the U.S. revealed in the same week that they were hit by data breaches. Also, we discuss new research just published by Symantec into the Waterbug/Turla group, and two different Android threats that were in the news this week.

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Bug bounties, bad passwords, and Radiohead

On this week’s Cyber Security Brief, it's episode 50! We discuss the EU’s bug bounty program, bad password security practice, and why “secure” websites are becomingly increasingly untrustworthy. We also chat about the start-up that hacked its own customers’ cryptocurrency wallets – in order to safeguard their funds, a further update on the RDP vulnerability we’ve discussed previously, and how the Spanish soccer league La Liga was misusing its mobile app. Finally, the story of how Radiohead called the bluff of a ransomware criminal.

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